Questions

PMTS Forum

Re: Questions

Postby jclayton » Mon Mar 01, 2010 12:04 pm

Yep ,
skiing is fun at all levels !
skinut ,among other things
User avatar
jclayton
 
Posts: 1019
Joined: Wed Oct 29, 2003 12:37 pm
Location: mallorca ,spain

Re: Questions

Postby jclayton » Mon Mar 01, 2010 12:05 pm

And a lot of the fun is had by others watching
skinut ,among other things
User avatar
jclayton
 
Posts: 1019
Joined: Wed Oct 29, 2003 12:37 pm
Location: mallorca ,spain

Re: Questions

Postby dbntina » Mon Mar 01, 2010 1:20 pm

Well, keep on the lookout for the video I post tonite when I get it uploaded because its hilarious (It probably won't be as funny to others but I know what was going thru my head at the time). I fell three times, and I couldn't see out of my goggles the last bit of the run because there was so much snow/ice inside them and them fogging up. At that point I just didn't care anymore and probably felt I could ski better not knowing what was coming.
User avatar
dbntina
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2009 8:33 pm
Location: Oklahoma City, OK

Re: Questions

Postby dbntina » Mon Mar 01, 2010 8:53 pm

Okay,

Here we go, here is the video at A-Basin on the West Wall still pushing up to release:



here is the video at A-Basin on Columbine trying to focus on staying forward and flexing to release:



Here we go, trying to ski the long chute at A-Basin. Pretty funny looking back on it now. I got to the top and couldn't figure out where I was. It looked so smooth and flat from the chairlift. When I looked down all I saw was bumps everywhere. Anyway good character building:



Enjoy
User avatar
dbntina
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2009 8:33 pm
Location: Oklahoma City, OK

Re: Questions

Postby jclayton » Tue Mar 02, 2010 9:13 am

I thought it was a pretty good effort . What is noticeable is the default leaning uphill , more exaggerated because of the tension induced by the terrain .

The tipping was always led by the LTE with a noticeable opening of the knees and the stance looked good ( narrow , I don't think you needed to " widen the feet more " ) , just need to balance better with CB and CA

You fell each time because of the leaning into the turn , if you watch your poles your outside one is always touching the snow ( you are almost leaning on it ) instead of the inside pole ( or both at the same time )

That terrain always looks easier in the video ( and from the chairlift )
skinut ,among other things
User avatar
jclayton
 
Posts: 1019
Joined: Wed Oct 29, 2003 12:37 pm
Location: mallorca ,spain

Re: Questions

Postby Ken » Tue Mar 02, 2010 10:35 am

So--now back up. Get on easier terrain and make perfect movements, one at a time. Make perfect tipping movements. Make perfect flexing movements. Get perfect at counterbalancing where your body is balanced over the front half of the inside edge of your outside ski. Do each of these on traverses first, then take them to easy turns. If you can't make perfect movements, go to even easier terrain. As you get locked in to perfect movements on easier terrain, move from green runs to dark green runs to light blue runs to dark blue runs.

For counterbalancing, try this--on the beginner run stand with your skis across the fall line. Balance on your downhill edges where your body is counterbalancing uphill. Push off and ride your edges as you arc to straight down the fall line. Flop over to the other edges and arc on the edges until you're across the fall line. Flop over to the other edges and ride them. Get this right going one way across the hill. Now switch and go across the hill the other way. It takes much more counterbalance than you can imagine! As you perfect this and go on tougher slopes, test yourself. During a turn be sure you can momentarily lift the free (inside) ski off the snow...just a millimeter and just for an instant, but a real lift. You'll know you have enough counterbalance skill when you can do this test.

Harald has described that each of should develop their own check list of the sequence of things we each need to get right. The sequence isn't the same for all of us. Visualize an old fashioned Rolodex where each page holds one movement. Which is the most important for you to get right first? That's your page one. Don't go beyond that until you have it right most of the time. Then flip the page to your second most important movement. Don't add your number three until you get your number one and number two right most of the time.

Your video shows continued up-extension at transition. That isn't a surprise...that run with new movements is sensory overload. Do feel the wrong movements and the right movements, and get one thing right at a time.
Rooster today
Feather duster tomorrow

VIDEO OF NOT ME
Ken
 
Posts: 778
Joined: Tue Nov 23, 2004 9:23 pm
Location: Washington, the state

Re: Questions

Postby dbntina » Tue Mar 02, 2010 12:07 pm

Jclayton,

Thanks for the feedback, you are exactly right. I definitely need to work on the CB and CA even more and my pole use way way off!

I got to say it was a whole lot of fun though, of course it will be infinitely more fun when I finally can do the terrain in decent/good PMTS form.

Ken,

That is a great point, I am going to work on getting it perfect on easier terrain first and then progress back up again.
I appreciate the feedback. I get to go again in 2 weeks and I will definitely work on my prioritized rolodex.
Let me pick just three things, in your opinion to work on to make the most progress:

First/most important: Get the flex to release and rid myself of the up-extension?
Second/most important: Get good at counterbalancing?
Third/most important: ?

Thanks, next time I go out I can work the drills for my specific 3 most important things for the biggest improvement. :D

David
User avatar
dbntina
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2009 8:33 pm
Location: Oklahoma City, OK

Re: Questions

Postby jclayton » Tue Mar 02, 2010 3:35 pm

You may be aware of this article , it's worth re-reading . Sometimes it looks like Harald has his outside arm low , but if you look at his upper body he has just the right amount of CB .

http://www.harbskisystems.com/harald/061028.htm).

If you feel the inside pole keeping back and pole tip touching the snow it assists CA . The pole should swing forward ready to plant in rhythm with the turn but the feeling is that it is still behind the outside pole in relation to the body , the swing should be forward down the fall line rather than toward the front of the skis as they turn .
skinut ,among other things
User avatar
jclayton
 
Posts: 1019
Joined: Wed Oct 29, 2003 12:37 pm
Location: mallorca ,spain

Re: Questions

Postby dbntina » Tue Mar 02, 2010 4:53 pm

Thanks for the info jclayton. I need to locate all those articles and start reading through all of them. I forgot those were available.

I am definitely going to keep working the pole drag as I think it will reinforce the movements.

David
User avatar
dbntina
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2009 8:33 pm
Location: Oklahoma City, OK

Re: Questions

Postby Ken » Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:33 pm

David

Is your tipping right? If yes, go to flexing. If not, get tipping just right. Then flex. Then CB/CA. You know enough about your skiing and what should be right to create your own list.
Rooster today
Feather duster tomorrow

VIDEO OF NOT ME
Ken
 
Posts: 778
Joined: Tue Nov 23, 2004 9:23 pm
Location: Washington, the state

Re: Questions

Postby dbntina » Wed Mar 03, 2010 6:07 am

Honestly Ken, I don't know if my tipping is right? I think it is, but I could be doing something wrong.

I don't have a background in skiing at all. I have read through the books and have gone through the dvd's numerous times, but I would be lying if I said I understood everything. There are quite a few times I read the posts on this board and I am not able to follow the dialogue. It makes sense because you can't cover everything in a book or dvd. So there seems to be knowledge that people have on nuances and things about PMTS that is not necessarily available just in the books/dvds. I could be wrong but that is the impression I am getting.

That is why I post my questions and skiing and thankfully everyone here is so willing to provide feedback and information so I am not totally going through the learning process alone and I really appreciate it.

So, I really don't know. Of course I think I am doing things right, but should there be something with the tipping that you see that I should work on specifically?

Of course on the obvious stuff: I know I am not flexing to release, my pole use is off, so those are obvious to me but I just want to make sure I am prioritizing things to fix that will make the biggest improvement the quickest, not focusing on the lesser important stuff. But definitely if my tipping is wrong I want to fix that first.

Thanks for your time and feedback Ken I appreciate it!

David
User avatar
dbntina
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2009 8:33 pm
Location: Oklahoma City, OK

Re: Questions

Postby carver_hk » Wed Mar 03, 2010 8:35 am

from the can't-back-out-now I notice that you was in the same situation as I was earlier this season. The chute tends to suck you down the fall line without giving you a chance to turn(even you have tipping). This tends to put you into backseat and therefore worsen the situation. What I did was pull back hard right after the release to make sure I was in center balance and wait for the sidecut bring me into the turns(assuming you have tipping). After I get used to it for a while things getting easy. What would the expert say? :)
I love line graphics :)
User avatar
carver_hk
 
Posts: 470
Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2007 6:44 pm
Location: Hong Kong

Re: Questions

Postby dbntina » Wed Mar 03, 2010 8:44 am

That sounds about right carver_hk.

Honestly, I am still brand new at this thing so I know I am doing a lot wrong. But Ken brings up a great point which I have read in older posts about finding out what your top 2 or 3 most important things to fix first to make the biggest improvement.

By posting my videos I hope to validate that my three things in order of priority would be 1) flex to release, 2) CB and 3) not quite sure.

But I realize I know book/dvd knowledge but my application is very weak. I don't have an eye for evaluation yet so I want to make sure I don't make any bad assumptions for what I should work on. Of course I need to work on everything, but I want to prioritize my focus.

There are some really knowledgeable people on here that can look at a 20 second clip and instantly tell things like: alignment issues and host of other things which I really don't have an eye for yet.

David
User avatar
dbntina
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2009 8:33 pm
Location: Oklahoma City, OK

Re: Questions

Postby carver_hk » Wed Mar 03, 2010 9:00 am

It is a very logical thinking. It happen to me as well. Its never easy to know what to work on less to say judge by yourself how good you r doing it. I ll say 3 things is already too much. May be two is better. As Harald said somewhere tipping must be the first thing to grasp before anything else. Are you able to tip well? And how good you need to be able to perform before you can focus on any other thing is probably another big question.Why not focus on tipping and post up some vid for MA on your tipping and see what the big name say. I would just put up proper MA like the other members do and see what the big names say. :)

edit: forgive me if I were duplicating what other people said in the thread as I was too busy at work to follow the thread from the beginning, which is a bit too long. :lol:
I love line graphics :)
User avatar
carver_hk
 
Posts: 470
Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2007 6:44 pm
Location: Hong Kong

Re: Questions

Postby dbntina » Wed Mar 03, 2010 9:05 am

You are probably right, those are great points.

I think when I go skiing next I will take video and post it in the MA section as that is the more appropriate forum and go from there.

Thanks carver_hk :)
User avatar
dbntina
 
Posts: 57
Joined: Mon Jun 08, 2009 8:33 pm
Location: Oklahoma City, OK

PreviousNext

Return to Primary Movements Teaching System

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests

cron