Weight on Stance/Free

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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby Max_501 » Tue Feb 12, 2013 8:54 am

10% is a reasonable goal while developing your movements. But it can range from 0 to 100%.

When would it be 100%?
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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby ChuckT » Tue Feb 12, 2013 12:02 pm

Max_501 wrote:10% is a reasonable goal while developing your movements. But it can range from 0 to 100%.

When would it be 100%?


Momentarily in the Weighted Release?
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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby cheesehead » Wed Feb 13, 2013 6:10 pm

Things went much better when I got consistent pullback at the starts of turns. But a big part of my problem was I was rotating quite a bit. I didn't think I was but it became obvious when we were doing "railroad tracks".
We also worked on alignment and canted the bte of my right foot.

Now if I could just figure out how to stop rolling my ankle ...
--- aka John Carey
Madison, Wisconsin
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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby RRT » Thu Feb 14, 2013 7:54 pm

So, given free ski pull back and varying amounts of flexing, if clean railroad tracks can be consistently performed at slow, moderate and fast speeds on groomed slopes, can it be assumed that PMTS skills in general and weight on stance/free ski specifically are progressing or is it possible to somehow cheat the system at various speeds on greens and blues? What about blacks - some release initially?
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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby HeluvaSkier » Thu Feb 14, 2013 8:00 pm

PMTS talks less about weight on the free foot, but rather balance on the stance leg. The best way to teach real balance is no weight on the free foot... then you know you aren't cheating.
Discipline is the refining fire by which talent becomes ability.

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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby Max_501 » Thu Feb 14, 2013 8:23 pm

RRT wrote:So, given free ski pull back and varying amounts of flexing, if clean railroad tracks can be consistently performed at slow, moderate and fast speeds on groomed slopes, can it be assumed that PMTS skills in general and weight on stance/free ski specifically are progressing or is it possible to somehow cheat the system at various speeds on greens and blues? What about blacks - some release initially?


Video is the answer.
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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby ToddW » Fri Feb 15, 2013 11:52 am

RRT,

Yes, it is possible to cheat and leave clean tracks. Even if you think you are pulling back and flexing.

Some folks attain this and turn via momentum or hip dumping rather than true PMTS tipping. Your CA can be badly off ... You might even be rotating. What you perceive as negligible weight on the inside ski may be very substantial. And the list goes on ....

Video is king. If you can't get video, work on all of the PMTS drills and focus on the external cues they use -- external cues mislead you far less often than feelings do.

Not only can one cheat as you suggest, it is in fact common among learners. You'll see a lot of cheating on day 1 on an HSS camp. By day 5 you see much less.
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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby h.harb » Fri Feb 15, 2013 12:08 pm

The indictor for cheating carving, is if you see the same radius at the top as at the bottom of the arc (and mostly on green because your skis will run away from you doing this on blue). And that is done by hip dumping, rotation and leaning; a-la-PSIA technique. And this cheating can only be done on Green or in one turn on blue, however it can't be done for 7 turns in a row on Black or Blue. If you can leave two clean edge lines and make the arc tighten it's radius, in the bottom third, that is expert PMTS skiing, (on Blue or Back runs). It doesn't matter if it's on blue or black, or slow or fast (fast is easier), ask Geoffda, if he's seen those lines I leave.

Ask Geoffda another question. If you can't do a brushed carved turn, can you make a decreasing radius pure carved turn? These are the standards of the Black level PMTS instructor, so don't be disappointed if you can't do it. No PSIA instructors can do these turns without extension, rotation and leaning. therefore they are not making PMTS standard turns. This is why PMTS Black level instructors and trainers are at a higher level, (and at a premium) we demand a higher level, of not only teaching, but skiing.

Remember, if you have never achieved or skied a higher level, you can't teach or ski, a PMTS required one. Achievement is a matter of commitment to the right movements and understanding teaching of those movements. And if you don't accomplish them completely, just going through the effort makes you a better skier than 99% of ski instructor on any slope. PMTS is upping the standards, so up yours!
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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby h.harb » Fri Feb 15, 2013 12:16 pm

In the videos shown here I perceive that the traverses between releases are far too long between releases. It's OK to practice one movement at a time; but you have to integrate it back into a real situation (short turn, bump turn etc) or you have gained nothing by your practice.
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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby h.harb » Fri Feb 15, 2013 12:18 pm

'Specificity of movements is the answer to gaining success."
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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby Erik » Fri Feb 15, 2013 4:04 pm

h.harb wrote:In the videos shown here I perceive that the traverses between releases are far too long between releases. It's OK to practice one movement at a time; but you have to integrate it back into a real situation (short turn, bump turn etc) or you have gained nothing by your practice.


Isolated focus of learning was precisely the purpose of the drills shown in the videos. Since the SuperBlue camp, I have been trying to incorporate super phantom moves into my free skiing more, and seeking out bumps to practice its effectiveness there, but no video yet. I feel like the effectiveness of the super phantom learning sequence improved my skiing in general, because I had to go back and work on all of the essentials to improve the super phantoms. When you are balancing on one ski, losing the balance is much more direct and obvious feedback than shifts in weight distribution on two skis. I think I added more proprioception data collection points into my turns for all of the essentials - it seems like there is a lot more time in the turn to pay attention to all of the essentials. One of the benefits is that I am finishing more of my turns in better form to initiate a super phantom on the following turn.

One of the things that we did in the SuperBlue camp to bridge the gap between the pure traverse drill scenario and a tactical situation was that Jay took us to an area at the edge of one of the groomed runs which was next to the bumps. He would then have us ski one turn deep into the bumps and come back out, with the direction to apply our single focus movement (such as balance on the the LTE, CA with strong inside hand position, super phantom, etc.) during the turn. It was a great way to see the effectiveness of the single focus movement in executing the turn, and then repeat that focus over several turns, each in a slightly differnt bump configuration. Later, we went into a real tactical situation in the middle of a bump field to apply it there.
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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby h.harb » Fri Feb 15, 2013 4:09 pm

I don't think you understand what I meant. A slightly longer transition is OK, but using the whole hill to find your little toe edge does nothing for you. In real skiing you are only on your little toe edge for a fraction of a second. You maybe doing yourself more harm but practicing it incorrectly.
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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby Erik » Fri Feb 15, 2013 5:52 pm

Harald-

Got it - thanks for the clarification. I'm definitely focused on linking the turns now.

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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby RRT » Sat Feb 16, 2013 9:21 pm

[quote="h.harb"] If you can leave two clean edge lines and make the arc tighten it's radius, in the bottom third, that is expert PMTS skiing, (on Blue or Back runs).

Harald,
Just checked out the "Performance Free Skiing" video and specifically the sections on 2 footed releases in skiing the steeps (West Wall at A-Basin) which emphasize flexing, bending and retraction. This footage beautifully addresses the top third, middle and bottom third of the arc related to being able to "carve" on blues and blacks.
Thanks,
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Re: Weight on Stance/Free

Postby h.harb » Sun Feb 17, 2013 11:23 am

Also watch the comparison, Geoffda was kind enough to allow me to put his run up there . At that time, three seasons ago Geoffda didn't have the tipping going for him. Now he does. Tipping and flexing out of the arc is important but flexing and tipping into the arc is everything on these steeps. These turns are exaggerated to show slow transitions, for demonstration.
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