The Power Transition

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The Power Transition

Postby jbotti » Wed Feb 14, 2024 8:39 am

Balance: Essential in skiing and in life!
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Re: The Power Transition

Postby enric » Thu Feb 15, 2024 8:41 am

:D as always, HH posts are AMAZING sources of gold nuggets....PMTS has so many subtleties and intricacies, it is like an onion with numerous layers (of knowledge and understanding; the same Essentials, but within a never-ending refining process)

HH: Hip angles should only be used or created after the lower body feet and ankles have started to create the new tipping angles under the hips.

Does this mean that in the high C and until the new edges are sufficiently engaged : both¿? :?: CB and CA efforts in the hips (hip angles both in the lateral and rotational aspect) should be created very subtly so as not to disrupt the new edge engaging process? I mean, clearly the new CA should be delayed in transition (holding old counter until on new edges, as HH has explained numerous times)... :idea: BUT I may interpret the above statement (and pictures in the post) as if the new HIP CB effort can/should also be delayed (as opposed to an exageratedly strong/early new CB effort) a bit, as if, a little, very subtle initial new inside hip leaning/relaxation helps engage the new stance ski edge when its directly under the hips in transition, ....but I would suppose also/simultaneously carefully managing the new inside hip hike needed to facilitate/enhance the absolutely necessary, mandatory new inside ski LTE TIPPING that is key to actually engage the new stance ski edge....I hope my explanation is not getting too convoluted :lol:

Thanks for keeping this Forum so helpful and enriching!
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Re: The Power Transition

Postby jbotti » Thu Feb 15, 2024 11:56 am

The hips are very powerful. If one goes for large amounts of hip CA early in the arc, that much hip counter will likely cause the tails to push out. And that movement of creating intense hip CA (very early in the arc) is opposite of waiting for pressure to build and letting pressure come to you. When practicing perfect brushed carved turns, its good to play with what to much hip CA, too early in the turn, does to the turn. It will create a less round arc, more of a right angle (its probably not really an arc). If you play with this, after several arcs/turns its easy to find the right amount (and the timing of adding hip CA) as each the turn develops. The higher the edge angles, the more hip CA that the arc will handle (without the tails washing out) and edge angles are (or should be ) increasing as we approach the apex. CA and hip CA should be maxed by the apex and held into the release and into the edge change transition.

The other thing that too much early hip CA often comes with is having your COM move aft and this will for the most part destroy any attempt at a perfect brushed carve turn.
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Re: The Power Transition

Postby jbotti » Thu Feb 15, 2024 1:29 pm

enric wrote:: as if the new HIP CB effort can/should also be delayed (as opposed to an exageratedly strong/early new CB effort)


Its best to not confuse CA (counteracting movements) with CB (counter balancing movements). Counteracting movements get our upper body and hips facing away from the direction that the skis are turning/moving (it's the opposite of upper body and hip rotation). Counter balancing is getting our weight over the stance ski. Too much/too early CA is discussed in the post above. Too much CB doesn't exist, because when we max our CB movements we are skiing on one ski (the stance ski), which is fine.
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Re: The Power Transition

Postby enric » Thu Feb 15, 2024 1:50 pm

Very enlightening explanation JBotti, thanks!

Yes, following HH advise in another post (a year ago) in this Forum I have lately been with modulating the force/impact of excessive hip counteracting...holding old counteracting until new edges helps avoid producing unwanted/unintended new stance ski skidding...even if not trying to create new counteracting, the unwinding of the old CA can easily produce too much skidding at turn entry in the high C. As you said, the hips are very strong, learning to modulate its strength and the timming of CA is very helpful when learning PMTS.

My other concern is whether or not, the same idea of modulating the strength and timming of the activation of new CAing can be applied to new CBing, especially in relation to HIP CBing (while early thorax CBing may have a more relevant role in turn initiation/new CB, probably is not as strong as hip CBing and creates a different effect on edge engagement). Lately I have tried to play with the timming and strength of the new CBing, especially for edge engagement in the high C....I believe while learning PMTS I may have been using a too strong, too early HIP CBing...I have tried to modulate both parameters while keeping the effort to create a slight hip hike at transition AND implementing new thorax CBing at turn initiation, with interesting results in terms of new edge engagement, I believe

In the POWER TRANSITION post by HH in his blog there are some interesting comments and pictures about
This is the no-pressure phase. It's the phase where the lower body does the tipping without a hip angle.
and
Pressure should come to you by increasing both lower body tipping and hip relaxation and dropping the hip to the inside.
and the two pictures that adjunct to those comments are very revealing...

...actually these pictures and comments remind me of the comments and pictures in another recent HH post https://harbskisysems.blogspot.com/2024 ... ic-at.html ...and a very interesting comment
The first fame shows equal foot, ankle, and hip angles developed from inside leg bending and hip relaxation. These actions allow the body to drop into angles with good control.
....I wonder also if this is related to my concern about too early HIP CBing...HIP ANGLES, managing HIP ANGLES, i.e. its strength and timming both in the lateral CB and rotational CA planes.

Saludos from the Pyrenees, the mountains without snow :( ...at least this season, courtesy of dramatic climate change :cry:
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Re: The Power Transition

Postby jbotti » Fri Feb 16, 2024 7:52 am

Again, there is no such thing as too much or too early CB.
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Re: The Power Transition

Postby Marc » Sat Feb 17, 2024 10:39 am

Enric,
I think what Harald is writing, is that you should lead the hip angulation—'dropping the hip to the inside'—with tipping the feet.

I guess the term "hip dumping" is when you drop the hip without the tipping?
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Re: The Power Transition

Postby jbotti » Sun Feb 18, 2024 4:07 pm

I think this is the relevant thread to address this issue:
https://www.pmts.org/pmtsforum/viewtopi ... 927#p57762
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